Free Class: Acupressure for Digestive Health

PC-6, excellent for nausea, heartburn, gastritis, or emotional upheaval causing stomach distress.

PC-6 – excellent for nausea, heartburn, gastritis, or emotional upheaval causing stomach distress – one of the many points we’ll be learning about in the free class.

I’ll be teaching a free class on self-care – Acupressure for Digestive Health – Saturday, Oct 3rd at the Natural Grocers at 12155 SW Broadway St, Beaverton, OR 97005. The class is 11-12:30. Come join us!

“Learn about digestion from the perspective of Traditional Chinese Medicine. We’ll discuss some handy acupressure points you can use at home to deal with reflux/ heartburn, nausea, constipation, diarrhea, IBS, Crohn’s disease, gastroparesis, gastritis, and blood sugar variations.”

 

Winter health tips – avoiding colds, SAD, cracked heels, & weight gain

Winter is coming!

In Chinese medical philosophy, infectious illnesses are considered to enter the body at the nape of the neck, so scarves are an important defensive weapon against getting sick. Although I think it has more to do with insulating the carotid arteries at the side of the neck, I am a big encourager of scarf wearing. In addition to preventing infections, a toasty cover will keep your neck muscles warm and relaxed. Pick out a soft, colorful one and give yourself a woolly hug. You can also give your immune system a boost by stimulating TB-5, and including garlic and ginger in your diet along with lots of hearty vegetables.

Don’t be S.A.D.!

If you suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder, the shorter days can sap your energy and leave you feeling depressed. You need to stimulate your pituitary gland, and the best way to do that is to get some time in front of a full-spectrum light, particularly in the morning. You can just pick up some full-spectrum light bulbs at the grocery store, or you can go in for a fancy “light box.” Soak up some photons at close range for about 15 minutes first thing in the morning, while having breakfast or catching up on Facebook.

Cracked Heel remedies

Winter health tip: keep your heels smooth and pain-free by treating cracks early, before they get out of control!

Winter health tip: keep your heels smooth and pain-free by treating cracks early, before they get out of control!

If your feet have suffered this winter, try this: Before bed, apply a high-quality lotion or wax (I like Waxelene, available at New Seasons. No nasty chemicals!) and put on some clean socks. This will keep the moisturizer on your feet rather than your sheets. I hate the restrictive sensation of wearing socks to bed, so I cut the toes off an old pair, which works beautifully. In the morning, before you shower, use a pumice stone or even a broad nail file on the DRY skin to remove the dead skin. If you have painful, deep cracks, use some SuperGlue (or better yet Dermabond) to hold them closed and continue with the routine above.

Holiday stuffing

Ah, parties and recipes and comfort food… it’s all fun and games until your pants don’t fit, isn’t it?

Think ahead about making good choices. Have a nutritious snack before a party if you suspect the goodies won’t be good for you.

Potluck? Bring something healthy instead of a dessert!

Focus on quality, not quantity. Save your calories for when they count: Skip the storebought cookies so you can splurge a bit on Aunt Susan’s homemade toffee.

Don’t use the “it’s the holidays” excuse from mid-November to the end of the year! ON the actual holiday, of course, allow yourself to indulge a little, but not everyday! That’s a big chunk of the year!

Winter Heath tip: Get some exercise! Peacock Lane (at 40th and SE Belmont) is annual festival of electricity and inflatable animals in human clothes, and makes for a fun walk.

Winter Heath tip: Get some exercise! Peacock Lane (at 40th and SE Belmont) is annual festival of electricity and inflatable animals in human clothes, and makes for a fun walk.

Bundle up and go for a stroll in a winter wonderland! Check out the lights wherever you live. Some light exercise will aid your digestion, mood, and keep your muscles and joints in good shape. Don’t forget your scarf! :)

If you do overeat, use St-36 to promote digestion. This point is great for nearly all stomach complaints, but be aware that it generates more gastric acid. If you’re having heartburn / reflux, use PC-6 instead. To help speed up peristalsis (the movement of food through your intestines), rub your belly clockwise circle (up on the right side of your abdomen, across the top, down on the left). This is good for painful gas retention, too. For small children, just use a few fingers.

I hope you find these Winter health tips useful. Stay warm! :)

ST-36 (energy boost, improve digestion)

Zu San Li, “Leg Three Miles”, is on the outside of the shin, just a few inches below the knee. Slide your fingertip up the outside edge of the tibia (shinbone) until you fall into a hole. It’s a large point, so trust your instincts. St-36 is deep: Press firmly!

ST-36: Zu San Li will give you wings!

St-36 builds energy in the body: After activating it, you supposedly “can walk another three miles.” I find it useful for treating chronic fatigue or for when you need a temporary boost on a rough day. Since it’s on the Stomach channel, it also helps aid poor digestion.

It nourishes your Yin and activates your Yang. St-36 is the Ruler of the Abdomen, so it’s good for most digestive complaints. Use it to treat indigestion, constipation, diarrhea, gas, malabsorption, diabetes, etc. Note: Stimulation can increase stomach acid, so it’s great for an overfull belly, but bad for ulcers or heartburn / acid reflux.